Dyeing With Indigo

Today I have a little indigo dyeing going on. I needed a light blue for a piece I have been commissioned to create, a blue to echo the Salish Sea. Indigo dyeing requires a lot of time and preparation. Yesterday I worked on creating the stock solution. Today was creating the working vat and then […]

via Indigo Dyeing — Handmade in Canada

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Bundling Up For Winter

The race is on. The last days of summer are coming to an end and I am busy eco printing and bundling fabrics to be used through the winter months. One hard frost and all the eco printing plants in my front garden will be done, what a sad thought.

laying out the leavesI have been super happy with my rose leaf eco prints recently. Not only am I achieving some lovely fabrics, but I am also slowly pruning a very large rose bush.

rose leafI start by laying out the prepped fabric and laying out the leaves.

all bundled upThen I bundle up the fabric, add some heat, add some time, and a dip.

eco printed fabricIsn’t it lovely!?

And all printed from nature.

Pretty cool.

eco printed fabric detailNow to plot what I will create from the piece. A pillow, a table runner, an art piece….we will have to see!

Finished pieces can be seen at www.debrahunter.wordpress.com and at www.thehuntergroup.ca .

Ecoprinting With Rose Leaves

rose bush This time of year the garden is growing. It is lovely to have the flowers and leaves to look at, but it is also great to have dyeing material almost literally on your doorstep. Rose leaves are great for eco-printing which is also called contact printing (and I am sure there are many other terms as well).

The  leaves I chose to work with come from my rose bush that grows in our front garden. It is a huge rose bush that easily grows over 6 feet high if I don’t keep up on my pruning. In June and July we are treated to lovely pink flowers with a wonderful smell, and in the fall we have huge rosehips dotting the bush.

materials ready for the project

I collected a handful of leaves from the rosebush and assembled the other items I needed: silk scarf, stick, leaves, and elastic bands.

scarf laid out

I laid the scarf out, dotted it with leaves, folded, rolled, and wrapped the bundle tight.

bundle

Then it was time for a little bit of steam, a little bit of time and a post mordant dip.

A wash, a dry, an iron, and the scarf was complete.rose leaf silk scarf 1 blogTo view another scarf using this same technique please visit www.debrahunter.wordpress.com and view the post “Rose Leaf Eco-print Scarf – #2”.